©
stars, hide your fires; let not light see my black and deep desires.

fashionsfromhistory:

Torah Crown
c.1740-1750
Italy

Exceptional for its size and precious material, this Torah crown is a rare survival of 18th-century Italian silver and a testimony to the artistic virtuosity of goldsmithing in Venice. In synagogues the scroll of the Torah, the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, is often decorated with a set of vestments and silver ornaments including a crown or finials, and a shield. The crown augments the Torah’s status as an object associated with royalty and speaks to the centrality of the Torah in Jewish life. The motifs depicted include ritual references such as priestly garments, a miniature temple, a menorah, and the Tablets of the Law, the latter engraved in Hebrew with the Ten Commandments. Such rich embellishment is indicative of the wealth and influential status of the Jewish congregation in the Venetian city state. The maker, Andrea Zambelli, is known to have made a wide range of ritual Judaica as well as religious silver for the local churches. A later inscription in Hebrew documents that this “crown of glory, and diadem of beauty” [Isaiah 28:5], was given by the philanthropist and president of the Jewish community in Padua, Gabriel Trieste, to his congregation in the mid-19th century. (The MET)

MET

fashionsfromhistory:

Torah Crown

c.1740-1750

Italy

Exceptional for its size and precious material, this Torah crown is a rare survival of 18th-century Italian silver and a testimony to the artistic virtuosity of goldsmithing in Venice. In synagogues the scroll of the Torah, the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, is often decorated with a set of vestments and silver ornaments including a crown or finials, and a shield. The crown augments the Torah’s status as an object associated with royalty and speaks to the centrality of the Torah in Jewish life. The motifs depicted include ritual references such as priestly garments, a miniature temple, a menorah, and the Tablets of the Law, the latter engraved in Hebrew with the Ten Commandments. Such rich embellishment is indicative of the wealth and influential status of the Jewish congregation in the Venetian city state. The maker, Andrea Zambelli, is known to have made a wide range of ritual Judaica as well as religious silver for the local churches. A later inscription in Hebrew documents that this “crown of glory, and diadem of beauty” [Isaiah 28:5], was given by the philanthropist and president of the Jewish community in Padua, Gabriel Trieste, to his congregation in the mid-19th century. (The MET)

MET

"To the dauphin and dauphine of France."

vagogh:

“Understanding is the first step to acceptance, and only with acceptance can there be recovery.” ― J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

vagogh:

“Understanding is the first step to acceptance, and only with acceptance can there be recovery.” 
― J.K. RowlingHarry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

Your fave is problematic: Santa Claus

religiousmom:

  • communist
  • illegal parking
wnderlst:

Haghartsin Monastery, Armenia | Areg Amirkhanyan

wnderlst:

Haghartsin Monastery, Armenia | Areg Amirkhanyan
notordinaryfashion:

Dolce & Gabbana - Details

notordinaryfashion:

Dolce & Gabbana - Details


And meet me there, bundles of flowers, we wait through the hours of cold.

And meet me there, bundles of flowers, we wait through the hours of cold.

north-and-prejudice:

Train station scene [1/?] a.k.a. The most rewatched scene in the entire series

free-parking:

Salvador Dalí, Ménagère, 1957, set of seven pieces of silver-gilt flatware

free-parking:

Salvador Dalí, Ménagère, 1957, set of seven pieces of silver-gilt flatware

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